Europeanlotteryguild.com

EuropeanLotteryGuild.com

Bad 1.6 | Reviews (5)
EuropeanLotteryGuild.com screenshort
InformationSecurity
Deposit: MasterCard, Maestro, Visa, Visa Electron, JCB, etc.
Bonus: No
US Allowed:
Languages:
Last updated on

European Lottery Guild Exposed — A Home of European Lotteries?

European Lottery Guild Review

Arriving at www.europeanlotteryguild.com, their home page is colorful and their little logo on the left definitely puts a smile on my face. I must confess though I didn’t need the scrolling window of a group of African children front and center in amongst other updates on the latest lotteries available. It was very distracting and got me sidetracked immediately. Dragging myself back to what I was here to do – check out their credibility – I started walking through their pages. So what did I find out?

Eloquent

This is a very persuasive site that is clean and easy to navigate. It is very straight forward without all the usual lengthy explanations of terms and conditions though they do provide sufficient information to answer most questions.

EuropeanLotteryGuild.com’s Games

The Europeanlotteryguild.com offers the basic European lotteries including British, Irish, French, German, Spanish (El Gordo, Summer Gordo, and El Nino) and EuroMillions. They provide a nice short and sweet explanation of each of the lotteries including tax information if applicable in that country.

Who Can’t Play at EuropeanLotteryGuild.com

It’s interesting that Europeanlotteryguild.com specifically identifies “our service is not available to residents of some countries, including the Netherlands, Canada, the United States and its territories, Liechtenstein or Switzerland”. It also states clearly that they cannot accept orders from a player for a lottery if they are residents of that country. Their example is if a person is living in France, they cannot play the French lottery through the European Lottery Guild. Players must be 18 years of age or older.

Winning at EuropeanLotteryGuild.com

According to the European Lottery Guild, they take no additional commissions or charge any fees for sending a player their winnings. This amount is built into the original amount spent on the ticket. Players who win over € 1500 will be notified by telephone. Lesser wins will be deposited directly into a player’s account. Winnings will be paid by check, bank draft, or money order.

Who Is the European Lottery Guild?

European Lottery Guild site says they offer opportunities for players to win European lotteries from ‘the comfort of their own home’. Their snail mail address is in the Netherlands though we weren’t able to confirm where they were actually registered.

Scams and Stories on European Lottery Guild

Digging deeper, I was shocked to find so much information on Europeanlotteryguild.com. Let’s start with Western Australia’s Department of Commerce. They go into an excellent explanation on the fact that this is a ticketing agent that offers syndicates but say you really don’t know what you are getting for your money (what the ticket cost actually is versus what they are charging for a service fee). It sounds like Europeanlotteryguild.com was actively promoting its service in Australia which is illegal.

Digging Even Deeper

Next was a site where a soon-to-be ex-employee provides an explanation of how Europeanlotteryguild.com works. He/she points out that though they have an address in the Netherlands, it is actually a call center run out of Vancouver, Canada. Part of the reason they have such a list of ‘free call’ telephone numbers is that that is what they do. This soon-to-be ex-employee says that once your phone number gets on their list, you actually have to take legal action to get them to stop. The targeted demography is retired pensioners primarily in the UK and Europe but also in Australia (which supports the previous information). This person also goes on to explain in detail how Europeanlotteryguild.com makes its money, the percentage of return, and how they misrepresent your lottery investment.

Jumping to New Zealand and the European Lottery Guild

A discussion board references the NZ Ministry of Consumer Affairs on a warning they have sent out on Europeanlotteryguild.com, though our team was not able to track down the original alert.

European Lottery Guild Customer Service

Besides the usual snail mail and email address, the European Lottery Guild offers a heap of ‘free call’ telephone numbers. They also offer ‘live chat’ though it does not indicate when it is available. On the social network side, they provide a Skype contact as well as a list of other networks including Digg, StumbleUpon, Reddit, Technorati, Delicious, Mixx, and Newsvine. I found it rather strange that there wasn’t any Facebook or LinkedIn.

The Bottom Line at EuropeanLotteryGuild.com

There is enough noise about this site to hit the delete button. In many ways, it’s what is not said on their site versus what is. Their terms and conditions are very limited without telling a player what they are actually getting into.

Pros:

Pretty Site

Easy to Navigate

Cons:

Fees Questionable

Information Questionable

Who Are They?

There is enough noise here and enough options out there to choose someone else to play with. Though I always read with suspicion soon-to-be ex-employee comments, the information provided made a lot of sense. Our team gives a thumbs down to EuropeanLotteryGuild.com.

This Lottery Agent Is Closed

  1. I used to work at this place in Vancouver and I ended up on this site when I was looking up (out of curiosity) to see if they still exist. It is unfortunate that they do.

    I noticed there are some fairly recent posts on here so it means people are still looking for information on ELG and I wanted to post this so that anyone who is looking for information on this place can get it straight from a former employee. I worked there almost 10 years ago, so some things might have changed, but, after looking at their website, it doesn’t seem like a whole lot is different.

    So, the way this place works is that they buy lottery tickets in one place (Germany for example) and then sell them to people in a different place (Australia, for example) at a massively inflated price (when I worked there, it was about 6 or 7 times the actual price of the ticket). So, you buy the tickets through the mail/phone/online, they buy them and tell you what your numbers are, and then you can check when the draw happens to see if you won.

    The bottom line is this place is not a scam, in the sense that they do actually buy the tickets and you do actually have a chance of winning something. However, I wouldn’t say that getting involved with these people is a good idea. Your odds are absolutely terrible and the salespeople very often misrepresent what people are buying. The biggest trick they use is selling people “syndicate” tickets (where you are only buying a portion of a ticket with up to hundreds of other people) while misrepresenting them as full tickets. This results in disappointment when someone wins, say $100, but then finds out they have to split it with 250 people.

    This company also engages in other horrible business practices. Working in customer service, I definitely got to deal with the ugly aftermath of their unethical sales practices. I took calls from different kinds of people who got tricked into wasting their money on this place, including people who were quite old and those who straight-up had dementia. These are the main targets and it became really sickening over the 2 years that I spent there. At the time I was working there, they were also highly focused on South Africa, specifically the poor townships where people are eager to change their economic situation and might be willing to listen to some slick salesperson calling from Canada telling them they are going to win just so much money.

    Basically, this company makes a lot of money doing awful things. If you get involved with them, they will likely begin to harass you. You might have to change your number or block them if you don’t want to play anymore.

    Just stay far far away from these people. There are much better ways to gamble online and if you have an elderly relative who is involved with them, do your best to get them out.

    I can confirm that they have offices in the Netherlands (where they seem to do much of the actual ticket buying and whatnot) but that sales, customer service, and several other company functions are handled at the Vancouver office. I worked in customer service for English and German-speaking “clients”.

    00
  2. This criminals or scumbags and scammers are calling from Canada and they called my landline numbers and asked me that did U want to play European Lotto. They called me about 10 times in ten years ago and they abusive me, threating me to gave them my credit card numbers to them and I said I did not have credit card. I still did not know where did they find out my landline numbers from and how did they find out my emails address from.
    My only options are I am disconnected the phone line and modem cable from the wall sockets. Then I contact the Victoria police, Australia Federal Police, Canadian Police and Interpol about this scammers straight away.

    00
  3. Their Dutch address in case anyone needs it.
    Continental Mail Processing
    Ebbehout 1
    1507 EA Zaandam

    00
  4. When it comes to lotteries, the chances of winning are roughly equal to the chances they will send you the money by mistake. If you do choose to play a lottery, please only purchase your local lottery tickets as some proceeds go to local programs. Sending money to another country is a disservice.

    That being said, ELG is not a scam, it’s just expensive and not worth the telemarketing calls you WILL receive for years to come. Play your local lottery people.

    00
  5. I can’t believe anyone would play at this site. I couldn’t resist going in and taking a look myself at some of the complaints. There are a lot. Most of them all go back to what i would call harassment. And I can’t believe they send stuff out by mail to try and get more players. I’m taking Lotto Exposed’s advice and definitely not going to play here.

    00
  6. Don’t touch the European Lottery Guild. They have taken £16,000 from my elderly friend’s bank account without her authorisation between August 2014 and January 2015 and still plaguing her with telephone calls.

    00
  7. Got the same letter from South Africa, thanks for this site. Letter is in the bin.

    00
  8. I just had a phone call from ELG and I said no. I have bought before but never won. Don’t listen to them.

    00
  9. European lottery guild – I just spent $140 NZ on El Gordo, are they a TRUSTWORTHY Organization?? Please tell me A.S.A.P.

    00
  10. Hiya, I sometimes play the lottery with oas from holland. Does anyone know anything about them? Is it a scam? Colin

    00
  11. I am from India and I received a letter by post from europeanlotteryguild with a special jubilee series entry registration form for 32 draws with 2408 winning chances asking me to pay $17 by cheque or draft or credit card. Are they real. How they can get my postal address with additional location mark, which is normally given to comopanies when you buy online to facilitate corier people to locate the address easily?

    00
    • i got too here in Singapore…

      00
    • Hi, Our review clearly says that you shouldn’t use this site. Press the link above and you’ll see ELG in a scam list. Our advice is to stay away. Daisy

      00

Roll over stars and click to rate

You may use these HTML tags and attributes:

I accept the Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.