Last updated on

Think You’ve Won the Millions? Think Again! Presenting the EuroMillions Lottery Scam

EuroMillions Lottery Scam

Lottery Scammers Never Take a Vacation

If you think that we’re done with lottery scams, boy, you’re wrong. The EuroMillions lottery scam has made it to the front pages of newspapers and websites, especially after a cute and adorable elderly couple suffered its consequences.

Unveiling the Lottery Scam

The EuroMillions lottery scam has already generated hundreds of complaints from people in Ohio.

It got mainstream attention after an elderly couple lost 62,000 dollars. Actually, the scammers happened to be exceptionally “generous” in an attempt to lure victims. Many others have been promised prizes reaching millions of dollars and spectacular awards.

The elderly couple, two individuals in their 80s, received a mail letter. It stated that the European lottery has been won. In order to get their 2.1 million dollars, however, the lucky winners had to handle taxes and fees. These amounted to the negligible sum of 62,000 dollars.

Though you may think that the scam is rather obvious, it has generated hundreds of complaints in Ohio. According to Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine, many of the individuals that became the victims of the EuroMillions lottery scam didn’t even report it. If they did, this would bring the total number of individuals who lost money to a whole new level.

EuroMillions – A Heaven for Scammers

This is far from the first time in which the name of the EuroMillions lottery has been used to scam individuals out of their hard-earned money.

In 2014, lottery fans in Adrian, Michigan, got letters similar to the one that cost our elderly couple 62,000 dollars.

The letters once again made the bold announcement that the recipient had won at least one million from the EuroMillions lottery. The victims were once again asked to send varying amounts of money in order to claim the prize.

EuroMillions lottery scams don’t only happen the old-fashioned way. It’s also possible to get an email announcing the big win. The email will have the following subject line: Congratulations! You are a Winner.

You’ll be asked to send back a reply to a certain email. Also, there will be a deadline for claiming the price. This creates a sense of urgency, making many individuals hoping for quick and easy cash do stupid things.

Never respond to any email inquiry from a stranger with personal information like your name, your social security number or your bank account. Also, delete the thing immediately, especially if you’re asked to make a tax or fee payment. Don’t open attachments that such emails contain – these could either be viruses or they could contain spyware giving scammers access to sensitive personal information.

EuroMillions Lottery Scams: What do They Look Like?

So, how can you protect yourself from EuroMillions lottery scams? For a start, follow one very simple rule. If something appears to be too good to be true, it probably is. If you haven’t participated in any lottery, chances are that nobody is going to be altruistic enough to share several million dollars with you. Or euros, for that matter…

Here’s a list of the most typical characteristics of a EuroMillions lottery scam:

  • As already mentioned, you can’t win if you haven’t participated
  • EuroMillions doesn’t offer random prizes to individuals having a certain email, phone number or address
  • To be a winner, you should have a ticket for a particular date and a particular lottery draw
  • Official lotteries will never ask you to pay for any additional, fees and charges (other than getting the original ticket that produced the prize)
  • Official lotteries don’t contact winners directly! Rather, as a winner, you’re responsible for monitoring results
  • If you receive an email, it will have a vague start like “dear winner.” It’s not going to contain your name (which means that it’s been sent to thousands of gullible individuals)
  • You will get a very short deadline and a time limit to collect your “prize”
  • You may get a letter that features poor spelling, poor grammar and inferior quality of the print

If any of these happen, please, please, please don’t share personal information and don’t send money. It’s a scam. An old scam, on top of that! It’s been around for so long because it continues being effective till present day by exploiting gullible individuals that hope to win something big without doing anything.

Have you received a EuroMillions lottery scam letter or email? In this instance, you should report to local authorities. If you’ve already done the stupid thing of submitting bank account or credit card information, contact your bank. They’ll know what to do to protect your money and make damage control as effective as possible.